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Are kidney stones serious?

Are kidney stones serious?

Kidney stones can be very painful, but they are usually not serious. In most cases, you will pass the stone with no trouble. Occasionally, you may need surgery to remove a stone that is stuck in your urinary tract.

If you have one or more kidney stones, your doctor will want to help prevent future stones from forming.

What are kidney stones?

Kidney stones are hard mineral deposits that form when there is too much of certain minerals in the urine. The deposits can block the flow of urine through the kidneys and cause pain. Kidney stones vary in size from a grain of sand to as large as a golf ball, depending on their composition and whether they form in one or both kidneys.

What causes kidney stones?

Most kidney stones are made of calcium oxalate (calcium combined with oxalic acid) or calcium phosphate salts (calcium combined with phosphoric acid). These types of stones are known as calcium oxalate calculi (COCs), calcium phosphate calculi (CPCs), or uric acid calculi (UAs). They can also contain struvite, cystine, hydroxyapatite, and brushite minerals in varying combinations.

Kidney stones are small mineral deposits that form within the kidneys. They can range in size from a grain of sand to as large as a golf ball.

Kidney stones that cause no symptoms are called “silent” stones. These stones usually pass out of the body without treatment. Stones that cause symptoms, however, are more likely to cause complications if left untreated and may require surgery.

Symptoms of kidney stones include:

Pain in your side or lower back followed by pain in your upper abdomen. The pain can be intense and may spread to other parts of the body, such as your groin or shoulders.

Blood in urine (hematuria). This symptom is often associated with passing a stone because it can irritate the ureter (the tube connecting the kidney to the bladder) during passage through it. The blood may be bright red or dark brown and look like coffee grounds or rust — it’s not always easy to distinguish from red blood cells seen on routine urine tests at a doctor’s office or lab. Hematuria can also indicate an infection or injury elsewhere in the urinary tract, so it’s important for your doctor to evaluate any hematuria you experience when stones aren’t present (such as when you have an infection).

Kidney stones are small mineral deposits that form in the kidneys. Kidney stones usually form when chemicals in your urine, such as calcium and oxalate, combine to form crystals.

Kidney stones can range in size from a grain of sand to a golf ball. The most common type of kidney stone is made up of calcium oxalate crystals.

Kidney stones are common. About 1 in 10 people will have at least one kidney stone during their lifetime, but many don’t have symptoms until later in life when they become larger and more painful.

Kidney stones can cause intense pain in the side or lower back, nausea and vomiting, fever or chills, blood in the urine or difficulty urinating — sometimes referred to as “horseshoe kidney.”

Kidney stones are small, hard deposits that form in the kidneys. They’re made of crystals that collect in your urine. Kidney stones can be as small as grains of sand and as large as golf balls.

Kidney stones are pretty common — about 10 percent to 20 percent of people will get them at some point in their lives. They usually form in the kidneys, but they could also form in urine collecting tubes or the bladder.

Potential complications include blood in the urine, a urinary tract infection and kidney damage if a stone moves into another part of your body (such as the ureter).

Some people have just one episode of kidney stones; others have a series of episodes over many years. If you get repeated stones, it’s called recurrent kidney stone disease.
Are kidney stones life threatening?

Should I worry about kidney stone?

Should I worry about kidney stone?
Should I worry about kidney stone?

Kidney stones are hard mineral deposits that form inside the kidneys. They can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball.

Kidney stone symptoms include pain in the back, sides, or groin. The pain may spread towards the lower abdomen. Sometimes there’s also nausea, vomiting and fever.

Kidney stones are caused by excess amounts of substances such as calcium, oxalate and phosphate in the urine.

Treatment for kidney stones depends on your symptoms and whether you have any underlying conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure. You may need to have surgery if the stone has moved out of your kidney and into your ureter (the tube connecting your kidneys to your bladder).

Kidney stones are small, hard deposits that form in your kidneys. They usually develop when urine contains high amounts of certain minerals, such as calcium, or complex proteins. The minerals and proteins stick together and form crystals that clump together to form kidney stones.

Kidney stones can range from the size of a grain of sand to larger than a golf ball. They can pass through your urinary tract without causing any pain or problems. But if they become lodged in your ureter (the tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder), they may block the flow of urine and cause severe pain in your back or groin area.

For most people, kidney stones cause only minor discomfort, but some people experience severe pain that requires medical attention.

If you have inflammation of the kidneys, it’s called pyelonephritis.

This is a common condition in women, especially those in their teens and 20s. It’s also more common in people who have had urinary tract infections before.

If your doctor suspects you have acute pyelonephritis, he or she may order a urine test to look for signs of infection. This can include white blood cells and bacteria in the urine, along with any other signs of infection like fever or chills.

The treatment for acute pyelonephritis is antibiotics, which will help clear up the infection quickly so that it doesn’t lead to permanent kidney damage or scarring (pyelonephritis can cause scarring if it goes untreated).

If you are in pain, or if you have a fever, or if you feel sick to your stomach.

If you have trouble urinating or if your urine is cloudy.

If you have blood in your urine.

If you can’t pass urine after three hours of trying, or if it hurts when you do.

In case of any of these symptoms, see your doctor immediately.

Are kidney stones a big deal?

Are kidney stones a big deal
Are kidney stones a big deal

Are kidney stones a big deal?

Kidney stones are one of the most common conditions treated by family physicians. They’re also one of the most painful.

“Kidney stones are common, but they’re not normal,” says Dr. Michael Fischbach, professor of urology at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. “They’re most often caused by a combination of genetics and lifestyle.”

The good news: By understanding what causes kidney stones and how to prevent them, you can do something about them before they become a problem. In some cases, even if you’ve already had stones, you can still make changes to your diet and lifestyle that will help prevent future recurrences.

Kidney stones are small, hard deposits that form in your kidneys. Most people get them at some point in their lives. Kidney stones often don’t cause symptoms. But some can be severe and require treatment.

Signs of kidney stones include:

Severe pain in your side or back below the ribs

Blood in your urine

Nausea and vomiting

Heavy sweating

The severity of a kidney stone depends on its size, location and other factors. Some stones can cause severe pain and blockages, while others may pass through the urinary tract without symptoms.

Large stones can lead to complications such as infection or permanent damage to your kidneys or ureters.

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Stones that become stuck in your kidney or ureter can interfere with urine flow and cause pain and bleeding. They may also cause scarring that blocks urine flow. The longer a stone stays in your body, the greater the chance of complications from it.

You may experience:

Blood in your urine (hematuria) due to a stone blocking your kidney or ureter

Severe pain in one side of your back (flank) — especially when you urinate or move around

Fever and chills if you have an infection in the urinary tract

Kidney stones are one of the most common medical conditions, affecting millions of people every year. In fact, kidney stones are the most common type of urinary tract stone.

About half of all people will have a kidney stone at some point in their lives, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The pain caused by kidney stones can range from mild to excruciating.

Kidney stones are usually small but can be as large as golf balls. If they become lodged in the ureter or bladder, they can cause severe pain that often requires emergency treatment.

What happens if you let kidney stones go untreated?

What happens if you let kidney stones go untreated
What happens if you let kidney stones go untreated

If you ignore kidney stones, they can cause serious complications. The most common complication is a blocked ureter, which is when a stone gets stuck in one of your tubes that transports urine from your kidney to the bladder. This can lead to infection and possible scarring of the tube.

Another common complication is an infection, which occurs when bacteria enters your urinary tract through an open wound caused by passing a stone. If the infection spreads into your bloodstream, it can be life-threatening.

Other complications include:

Chronic pain, which may last for years

Blood in your urine (hematuria), which is usually caused by bleeding from a blockage in one of your tubes that connects your kidney to the bladder or urethra (the tube that carries urine out)

The longer you wait to treat a kidney stone, the more likely it is to become larger and more difficult to pass.

If you experience pain in your lower back that doesn’t go away or if you pass blood in your urine, see a doctor immediately. These symptoms can indicate that the stone has moved into your urinary tract and caused an obstruction that requires surgery.

Kidney stones can also cause infection. If you have a kidney stone, be sure to wash your hands thoroughly before and after using the bathroom, even if it doesn’t hurt. This will help reduce the risk of introducing bacteria from the stool into your urinary tract.

Kidney stones are solid formations that occur inside the kidneys, the organs that filter blood. The majority of kidney stones are composed of calcium and other minerals, but they can also be made up of uric acid, cystine and xanthine. They can vary in size from as small as a grain of sand to larger than a golf ball.

If you have kidney stones, you may experience pain in your back or side that feels like a sharp pinch or dull ache. You may also feel pain radiating to your groin or sex organs. In some cases, the pain is so severe that it causes nausea and vomiting. Kidney stones may also cause blood in the urine or bloody stools.

Some kidney stones don’t cause any symptoms at all until they pass out through the urethra — the tube that carries urine from your bladder out of your body — and become lodged in the urinary tract (where they can block urine flow). If a large stone blocks urine flow completely, it can cause severe abdominal pain and force you to go to an emergency room right away.

Causes

Kidney stones form when substances normally found in urine become hardened into crystals that clump together into solid masses. These substances can include calcium, ox

Kidney stones are hard mineral deposits that form in the kidneys. They usually pass out of the body without treatment, but sometimes you’ll need to go to a hospital for treatment.

Kidney stones can be small or large and may be made of calcium, uric acid or cystine.

You’re more likely to get kidney stones if you:

Are male

Are over age 40

Have had surgery on your urinary tract (such as having your prostate removed)

Are overweight or obese

Are dehydrated

Have diabetes (high blood sugar)

When is kidney stone an emergency?

When is kidney stone an emergency?

Kidney stones that are large enough to cause obstruction or blockage of the urinary tract need to be treated promptly. If you have a kidney stone and are experiencing severe pain, vomiting or nausea, or dehydration, you should seek medical attention as soon as possible.

If you have a small kidney stone and have no symptoms, it’s not necessarily an emergency. However, if you’re concerned about your condition, it’s best to see your doctor right away.

Treatment options for kidney stones vary depending on their size, location and type. The following are some common treatment options:

Pain medication (such as acetaminophen). Your doctor may recommend taking over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil). These medications can help relieve pain associated with passing a small or medium-sized kidney stone.

Blood pressure medicine (diuretics). Diuretics help rid your body of excess fluid by causing increased urination. They may be used temporarily after passing a small or medium-sized kidney stone if there’s concern about re-formation of another stone (recurrent stone formation).

When is kidney stone an emergency?

It’s not always easy to tell when you need to go to the hospital for a kidney stone. Some people can pass a small stone on their own, and others might not feel any pain at all. But if you have large stones or many stones, or if you’re in extreme pain that doesn’t get better after several hours, it’s time to call 911 or your local emergency number.

If you have a large stone blocking one of your kidneys, that’s an emergency. This can cause severe pain and other complications such as infection and bleeding.

When should I see my doctor about kidney stones?

It helps to know what to expect from your doctor after you’ve been diagnosed with kidney stones — whether they’re small or large, formed naturally or caused by infection. Some types of stones (such as struvite) require treatment with antibiotics before they can be safely passed out of the body. Your doctor will discuss treatment options with you based on the type of stone you have.

A kidney stone is an accumulation of solid crystals in the kidney. The crystals may be composed of calcium, uric acid, or other substances. Although they are not usually serious, they can cause intense pain in the lower back and sides (kidney stones often occur in both kidneys). Kidney stones can also lead to infection.

Kidney stones are common. About 1 out of 10 men and 1 out of 20 women will have a kidney stone at some point during their lifetime. In most cases, people with kidney stones will pass them without treatment. However, sometimes symptoms may be severe enough that you need to see your doctor or go to the emergency room for evaluation or treatment.

When should I call my doctor?

If your symptoms are severe and include blood in your urine or severe pain in your side that doesn’t go away after 2 days, call your doctor immediately.

Kidney stones are small, hard mineral deposits that form in the kidneys. They can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball. Some types of kidney stones don’t cause symptoms and can pass through the urinary tract without anyone knowing they were ever there. Other types of kidney stones cause pain and are an emergency requiring immediate treatment.

Symptoms of kidney stones include:

Pain in your side or back below your ribs

Pain while urinating

Blood in your urine

Nausea and vomiting

Does kidney stones mean kidney failure?

Does kidney stones mean kidney failure
Does kidney stones mean kidney failure

Does kidney stones mean kidney failure?

No, kidney stones do not mean kidney failure. However, if you have a history of recurrent kidney stones, you may want to get your blood and urine tested regularly by your doctor to monitor your health.

How do I know if I have kidney disease?

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done, with special attention paid to looking for signs of swelling in the ankles or legs. You may also undergo tests to determine how well your kidneys are working (e.g., urine tests).

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Yes, kidney stones can cause kidney failure.

Kidney stones are caused by small crystals that form in the kidneys. The body is trying to get rid of something that shouldn’t be there — a waste product from food or fluid from the bloodstream — but the kidney stone prevents this from happening.

The most common type of kidney stone is made of calcium and other minerals. These stones may be as small as grains of sand or as large as golf balls. Small stones often pass through your body without causing any problems, but larger ones can become lodged in your urinary tract and block the flow of urine.

Kidney stones can cause:

Severe pain in your back or side (kidney pain)

The short answer is no. Kidney stones are a symptom of kidney disease, not the cause. But kidney stones can cause kidney failure if they’re left untreated.

Kidney stones form when substances in your urine solidify and turn into small crystals that stick together. Your kidneys filter out waste from your blood so you can urinate it out of your body. If something blocks that process, it can lead to kidney stones.

The most common types of kidney stones are:

Calcium oxalate (most common)

Uric acid (less common)

Cystine (rare)

It’s not uncommon for people to have kidney stones. In fact, it’s estimated that about one in 10 people will develop a kidney stone at some point in their lives.

Kidney stones are small mineral deposits that form in your kidneys. They’re caused by a combination of factors including dehydration, low levels of certain nutrients and a high-sodium diet.

There are two main types of kidney stones: calcium oxalate and uric acid. Calcium oxalate stones are the most common type and are often described as being “hard” or “sand-like” in appearance. Uric acid stones are more likely to occur if you have gout or diabetes; they’re softer than calcium oxalate stones and may look like crystals or gravel instead of sand.

What will ER do for kidney stones?

If you have kidney stones, you may be wondering what the emergency room (ER) will do for you.

The good news is that most people don’t need to go to the ER for kidney stones. This is because there are many treatments for kidney stones that can be done at home or in your doctor’s office. For example, taking pain medicine and drinking lots of fluids may relieve your symptoms. Your doctor might also recommend dietary changes or prescribe medication to help dissolve the stone or prevent new ones from forming.

Kidney stones are small crystals made up of minerals and salts in urine that form inside the kidneys, ureters (tubes connecting kidneys to bladder), or bladder. There are different types of kidney stones, but they all cause pain and other symptoms when they move through the urinary tract. Stones can range from a few millimeters wide to several centimeters long; some may be hard enough to see but others are too small for an X-ray machine to detect without special equipment.

If left untreated, severe pain caused by a kidney stone can lead to dehydration and infection if the stone blocks a section of your urinary tract or causes other complications such as bleeding from irritation

The emergency room doctor will do a physical exam and review your medical history. He or she may order tests, such as an ultrasound or CT scan, to determine the cause of your symptoms.

Treatment is based on the type of kidney stone and how severe the symptoms are. Some stones pass without treatment, but others require treatment to prevent them from recurring or causing more serious problems. If you have severe pain that doesn’t respond to home treatment, go to an ER immediately for evaluation and treatment.

If you’re diagnosed with a kidney stone, your doctor may recommend one or more treatments:

Pain medication. Over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil) can help ease discomfort until the stone passes naturally. If ibuprofen doesn’t relieve your pain, talk to your doctor about taking prescription pain medications such as codeine or morphine. These drugs can be addictive if used long term and should be used sparingly.

Stone extraction (lithotripsy). This procedure involves breaking up stones into smaller pieces so they can pass through the urinary tract more easily. A lithotripsy machine uses ultrasonic waves or shock waves to break up the stones; however, it can also cause further damage to tissue in

A kidney stone is a solid piece of material (called a calculus) that forms in the kidneys. Kidney stones can be as small as a grain of sand or as big as a golf ball. They may cause no symptoms, but some can lead to severe pain that requires emergency treatment.

What causes kidney stones?

Kidney stones are most common in adults over age 40, especially men. They are more common in people who have had stones before and in people with certain health conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes.

What do kidney stones feel like?

The most common symptom of kidney stones is pain in your lower back or side that comes on suddenly and gets worse over time. You may also have nausea, vomiting or diarrhea if your stone blocks your ureter (the tube that carries urine from your kidney to the bladder). When this happens you might not pass urine for some time because it’s stuck behind the stone.

You should have a kidney stone evaluated by your doctor. There are several ways to do this, including:

A urine culture. This is a test that checks for bacteria in your urine. If you have blood in your urine, and it’s not red blood cells (which could mean you have an infection), then the doctor may send a sample to the lab for testing.

A CT scan or ultrasound. These scans use x-rays and sound waves, respectively, to create images of the inside of your body so that doctors can see if there are stones present and their location.

A cystourethrogram (also called a bladder ultrasound). This involves filling your bladder with water so that doctors can look at its lining using special x-rays taken after the water is removed from your bladder. This test can show if there are stones blocking part of your urinary tract or kidney stones lodged in another place such as the ureters (tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder). You’ll likely need anesthesia before this test because it requires putting something into your bladder during x-ray imaging so that you don’t feel pain while lying on your side while they take pictures of your lower abdomen area.

What is the fastest way to dissolve a kidney stone?

What is the fastest way to dissolve a kidney stone
What is the fastest way to dissolve a kidney stone

The fastest way to dissolve a kidney stone is by drinking water.

Drinking plenty of water is the best thing you can do for your health, and it may be the best thing you can do for a kidney stone.

The reason you should drink a lot of water when you have a kidney stone is because the kidneys don’t filter out all the minerals that are in urine. A kidney stone forms when these minerals build up in the urine and crystallize into solid lumps. The more concentrated your urine is, the faster new stones will form after treatment, even if treatment was successful at dissolving old ones.

So, if you want to dissolve your stones and prevent new ones from forming, drink lots of water every day — especially during your treatment period.

There are several ways to dissolve kidney stones. A healthcare provider will determine the best method for your situation.

There are several ways to dissolve kidney stones. A healthcare provider will determine the best method for your situation.

Surgery: Your doctor may recommend surgery if you have a large stone, if there are multiple stones or if you have an infection in your urinary tract. Surgery can also be used to remove a stone that’s been left behind after another procedure. In some cases, surgery is performed before other treatments so that doctors can see what they’re dealing with and plan accordingly.

Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP): This procedure uses flexible endoscopes inserted through your mouth, down your throat and into the stomach and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). Doctors use X-rays during ERCP to guide them while they pass instruments through the bile ducts from the liver into the pancreas. They then inject dye into your bile ducts so they can see where any blockages are located and what caused them (such as kidney stones). If necessary, ERCP may be done with an endoscope placed through a small incision in your abdomen

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The best way to dissolve a kidney stone is to prevent it from forming in the first place.

Kidney stones occur when there’s an imbalance of minerals in the urine, usually calcium and/or oxalate. These minerals can come from foods you eat and drinks you drink, but they also can come from your body itself. If you have kidney stones, you might want to talk with your doctor about ways to keep them from coming back.

One way is to change your diet so that it contains less sodium and more potassium. Sodium makes urine more acidic, which makes oxalate easier for your body to absorb. Potassium makes urine less acidic, so it decreases the amount of oxalate absorbed by your kidneys. You may be able to lower the amount of oxalate in your diet by avoiding certain foods or drinks high in oxalate (such as spinach, rhubarb and chocolate).

The most common treatment option for kidney stones is dissolution therapy. This involves injecting a solution into the stone that dissolves it over time. The patient will then pass the stone with their urine.

If your doctor recommends this type of treatment, he or she can also give you advice on how to prevent kidney stones from forming again. For example, if you have high levels of calcium in your urine, your doctor may recommend that you take calcium supplements or reduce your calcium intake from foods such as dairy products or dark green leafy vegetables.

Your doctor may also suggest that you consume less sodium and potassium, which are minerals found in many foods and drinks. Sodium makes urine more concentrated and can increase the risk of developing kidney stones. Potassium can help prevent them by keeping urine diluted.

Do they keep you in the hospital for kidney stones?

I saw a urologist two years ago and they said they were kidney stones and they had to put me in the hospital. The reason they did this was because it had started to move down into my ureter, which is the tube that takes urine from your kidney to your bladder. When this happens, it can cause a blockage in the tube and there is only one way to get rid of it, which would be surgery. I’m not sure if these are common, or if they are just too small (which is what they said happened in my case).

They said that most people who have them don’t even know what’s going on until after it passes through their system (I guess because they don’t have any symptoms). They don’t usually have any symptoms at all unless it gets stuck somewhere along its path.

I would recommend seeing your doctor about this issue as soon as possible so that you can get treated for whatever is causing your pain!

The treatment for kidney stones depends on their size, location, and number.

Kidney stones that are small enough to pass on their own may not need any treatment. However, if the stone is large or causing discomfort or pain, it will likely need to be removed.

Treatment options include:

Pain medication. Medications can help control pain caused by a kidney stone. Your doctor may suggest a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as ibuprofen (Advil) or naproxen sodium (Aleve). You should avoid taking aspirin since it could make your blood pressure drop dangerously low and increase bleeding risk. Some NSAIDs can cause stomach bleeding or ulcers; ask your doctor if these are possible side effects for you before starting this type of medication. If you have heart problems, arthritis , or high blood pressure , talk with your doctor about any potential risks before taking an NSAID.

Other pain relievers include acetaminophen (Tylenol) or tramadol (Ultram), but these aren’t recommended for people with kidney disease .

Surgery to remove the stone. Surgery is an option when medications aren’t effective and you experience ongoing pain from a kidney stone

The answer to this question depends on a number of factors:

How large are the kidney stones?

Are they impacted or floating?

What is your general health and age?

Are you pregnant or breastfeeding?

Do you have a history of kidney stones, gout, or other metabolic issues?

Do you have any other medical problems that may complicate treatment plans (such as diabetes or heart disease)?

In most cases, kidney stones pass through the urinary tract without any intervention. In fact, most people don’t even realize they have passed a stone until it happens. However, some patients may require treatment to make sure that their stones pass safely and easily. This could mean taking medications to help dissolve the stones or having surgery if the kidney stone is too large for other methods to work.

Kidney stones are small, hard deposits that can form inside the kidneys. They’re made up of crystals and salts. They can be made up of calcium or uric acid.

In most cases, kidney stones aren’t serious and don’t cause any symptoms. But if you do have symptoms, they might include:

Pain in your side just above your hip

Bloody urine (hematuria)

Nausea and vomiting

Fever

Why do people get kidney stones?

Why do people get kidney stones
Why do people get kidney stones

Kidney stones are hard mineral deposits that form in the kidneys. They can range from as small as a grain of sand to as large as a golf ball.

The kidneys filter waste and extra fluid out of your blood. Stones form when substances in urine mix with minerals and salts in the urine and harden into solid crystals or clumps.

It’s not clear why some people get kidney stones, but there are a number of factors that increase your risk:

Your diet, particularly high intakes of animal protein and salt, may play a role in some cases.

Kidney stones affect men more often than women. Children rarely get them, but they’re more common in young adults than older adults.

A family history of kidney stones may increase your risk.

Kidney stones are small, hard deposits that form in the kidneys. They can vary in size from a grain of sand to a pearl. Kidney stones usually occur when the urine contains too much calcium or oxalate.

A common cause of kidney stones is dehydration (lack of fluids). The kidneys filter your blood and produce urine as a waste product. If you don’t drink enough water or other fluids, you may not make enough urine to dilute your waste products, which can lead to kidney stones.

Other risk factors include:

Age — Kidney stones are more common in men than women after age 40 and in white men more than any other race.

Family history — If one of your parents had kidney stones, there’s an increased risk that you’ll develop them as well.

Kidney stones form when minerals in urine crystallize and clump together. These crystals can be as small as grains of sand or as big as golf balls. They may be made up of several different minerals, including calcium, oxalate and uric acid.

The most common type of kidney stone is calcium oxalate, which accounts for about 80 percent of all cases. Calcium phosphate stones are the second most common type of kidney stone.

Other types of kidney stones include uric acid stones and cystine stones.

Kidney stones are formed when compounds that normally exist in urine become concentrated and crystallize in the kidney or urinary tract.

The most common type of kidney stone is calcium oxalate, but other types include uric acid, struvite, cystine and xanthine.

There are several factors that can lead to stones, including:

Excess calcium in the diet. This can lead to calcium oxalate stones. Foods with high levels of oxalate include rhubarb, beets and sweet potatoes.

Sodium-rich foods. High sodium intake increases your risk for developing uric acid stones because it increases your urine’s acidity, which leads to more uric acid production. Sodium is found in many processed foods as well as table salt.

Problems with your kidneys’ ability to filter waste products from your blood into your urine. This problem can cause calcium phosphate stones and struvite stones (in addition to other kinds).