How is testicular pain treated?

How is testicular pain treated?

Tenderness in the testicles can be caused by an injury, infection, or an irritation of the skin. The most common causes of testicular pain are inguinal hernias and epididymitis. Other possible causes of pain include testicular torsion, epididymo-orchitis, varicocele and testicular cancer.

Treatment depends on the cause of your symptoms. If you have a fever or other signs of a serious illness, such as chills or nausea, see your doctor right away.

Inguinal hernias

Inguinal hernias occur when part of the intestine pushes through an opening in the abdominal wall into a sac that forms just below the groin area (the inguinal canal). The intestine may also push into this sac if there’s weakness in the abdominal wall muscles that hold it in place. An inguinal hernia usually causes no symptoms but can become red and painful if there’s pressure from swelling or straining during exercise or heavy work. Men who have had inguinal hernias since childhood may not notice any symptoms until they’re older because the intestines are more flexible when you’re young than when you’re older.

The best way to treat testicular pain is to determine the cause and correct it. For example, if you have an infection or inflammation in the testicle, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics or anti-inflammatory medications.

If the cause is cancer, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove the affected testicle.

If you experience sudden testicular pain, however, you should see a doctor immediately. This could be a sign of testicular torsion — when blood flow stops going to the testicle, causing swelling and twisting of its spermatic cord (which contains blood vessels and nerves). If left untreated, this condition can cause infertility or even death.

Testicular pain can be caused by a variety of conditions, including testicular torsion, epididymitis and inguinal hernia. Treatment depends on the underlying cause.

Testicular torsion

Testicular torsion occurs when the testicle rotates in its sack, cutting off blood supply. This causes severe pain and swelling in one testicle. Testicular torsion is an emergency as it can lead to infertility or even loss of the testicle if not treated quickly.

If you think you are experiencing testicular torsion, contact your GP or go straight to A&E. They’ll examine your scrotum and order an ultrasound scan if necessary. The doctor will then decide whether you need surgery or not (see below).

Testicle pain can be caused by a number of things. However, if you experience testicle pain, you need to see your doctor as soon as possible.

Testicular cancer is one of the most common types of cancers in men between ages 15 and 45. It’s also one of the most treatable cancers — if it’s caught early.

There are different types of testicular cancer:

Seminomas (which make up 80 percent of all testicular cancers). These are less likely than other types of cancer cells to spread beyond the testicle into other organs in the body (metastasize). This makes them more curable than nonseminomas.

Seminomas account for about 75 percent of all cases of testicular cancer.

Nonseminomas (which make up 20 percent). These are more likely than seminomas to spread beyond the testicle into other organs in the body (metastasize). This makes them harder to cure than seminomas.

How do doctors treat testicular pain?

There are many causes of testicular pain, which can be uncomfortable or even painful.

The most common cause of testicular pain is an infection or inflammation of the epididymis — a tube that carries sperm from the testicle to the vas deferens. This condition is called epididymitis. Another common cause of testicular pain is an injury to the scrotum.

Testicular pain can also be caused by cancer in your testicles, but this is rare and usually only occurs in older men.

How do doctors treat testicular pain?

Treatment depends on what’s causing your symptoms. If you have an infection, antibiotics may be prescribed. If you have an injury, ice packs and rest will help ease discomfort until the swelling goes down on its own within a few days to a week or so. Your doctor may also suggest that you take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) to help reduce swelling and pain.

Doctors treat testicular pain with many different medications and treatments. If you have pain in one or both of your testicles, you should see a doctor as soon as possible.

Doctors will first try to determine whether the pain is due to an infection or injury. They may order blood tests and other scans to rule out other causes.

If your doctor suspects that you have an infection of the epididymis (ep-uh-DID-uh-mis) — a tube that carries sperm from the testicle to the vas deferens — he or she may prescribe antibiotics. If the infection is bacterial, it can usually be treated with antibiotics.

If your doctor thinks that you have injured yourself during exercise or sports, he or she may recommend rest and ice packs for several days. You may also need pain medication if the injury is severe enough that it’s affecting your ability to function normally in your daily life.

The first thing to do if you are experiencing testicular pain is to see a doctor. The doctor will examine your testicles and perform some tests to determine the cause of the pain. If there are signs of infection or cancer, he or she will recommend treatment.

Testicular cancer is almost always treatable with surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. If it has not spread to other parts of the body, it can often be treated successfully. However, if it has spread, treatment may not be as effective.

Infections are also usually treatable with antibiotics and sometimes surgery.

Testicular pain can be caused by a number of conditions, including:

Infection of the testicles (orchitis). This is usually caused by an infection spread through sexual activity.

Injury to the testicle. Testicular injury can occur during sports such as rugby and football, or during accidents.

Testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is rare in young men, but it’s important to get checked if you have any symptoms.

It can be difficult to distinguish between different types of testicular pain. If you’re worried about your symptoms, speak to your GP or visit your local sexual health clinic for advice and tests if necessary

Can testicle pain go away on its own?

Can testicle pain go away on its own
Can testicle pain go away on its own

It’s possible that the pain will go away on its own. However, it’s important to get medical attention as soon as possible.

Pain in one or both testicles usually means there’s a problem with your reproductive system, but it could also be due to an injury or infection.

The most common cause of testicle pain is epididymitis, which is inflammation of the epididymis — the tube that carries sperm from the testicle to the vas deferens (the tube that carries sperm from the testicle to the penis).

What causes testicle pain?

There are many possible causes of testicular pain. The most common cause is epididymitis, which is inflammation of the epididymis — a tiny coil attached to each testicle where sperm mature and develop into healthy sperm cells for ejaculation.

Testicular pain is a common condition. It can be caused by a number of different things, including trauma and infection.

Testicular pain can also occur as part of a more serious condition, such as testicular cancer.

Usually, testicular pain will go away on its own within a few weeks. But if it persists for longer than three months, you should see your GP for advice.

How long does testicular pain last?

The length of time that you experience testicular pain depends on what’s causing it:

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If you’ve had an injury to your testicle — for example, if you’ve been kicked or hit there — the pain should go away within two weeks. But if you still have symptoms after four weeks, see your GP as soon as possible so they can check whether there’s an underlying cause for the pain (for example, an infection).

If your testicles are swollen due to an infection such as mumps or glandular fever, the swelling should start to go down within about three days (although it may take up to two weeks for all the swelling to go). If there’s no improvement after three days or if the swelling increases in size or becomes pus-filled

If you’re suffering from testicle pain, there are a number of things you should know.

First, it is important to understand that testicle pain is not always a sign of cancer. In some cases, testicle pain can be caused by an injury or other physical condition.

Second, if you experience testicle pain that lasts more than a few days or weeks, you should seek medical attention immediately because it could be a sign of something more serious.

Third, most cases of testicle pain are easy to treat and resolve quickly. However, there are some circumstances that require more intensive treatment. The good news is that most cases of testicular cancer are curable with proper treatment and care.

The best way to determine whether your testicle pain is serious is to see your doctor.

The most common cause of testicle pain is epididymitis, an infection of the tube that carries sperm from the testicles. Other possible causes include:

Injury or trauma to the groin area (for example, during sports)

Inguinal hernia

Testicular torsion — a twisting of the spermatic cord that cuts off blood supply to the testicle and causes swelling in the scrotum

Testicular cancer

How long does testicle pain take to heal?

The pain in the scrotum can be caused by many different conditions, from inguinal hernias to testicular torsion. Some of these conditions require immediate medical attention, but most do not.

How long does testicle pain take to heal?

The time it takes for the pain to go away depends on what is causing it. The most common causes include:

A blow to the groin or abdomen

Testicular torsion (twisting of a testicle)

Infection in the epididymis or vas deferens (two tubes that carry sperm along the length of the testicle)

Testicle pain is a common condition, and it can be quite unpleasant. While most testicle pain is not serious, it’s important to see your doctor if you’re concerned about your symptoms or if they don’t go away on their own.

How long does it take for testicle pain to go away?

If you have sudden testicle pain and don’t have a history of injury, the chances are good that it will resolve on its own within a week or two. If you have chronic testicle pain, this may be due to an underlying medical condition such as an infection or cancer.

It depends on the cause of the pain. If you have an infection, it can take a few days to several weeks for the symptoms to go away.

If you have a hernia, it may take several months for the pain and swelling to go away completely.

It’s important to see your doctor if you have testicle pain, because there are many different causes of testicle pain. Some require emergency treatment, while others can be treated with home remedies or over-the-counter medications.

The testicles are the male reproductive organs. They produce sperm and testosterone, which is the hormone responsible for male characteristics such as facial hair and a deep voice.

Testicular pain most often occurs when something presses against or irritates the testicle. It can be caused by an ingrown hair, trauma from playing sports or an infection in the body. The pain usually goes away within a few days or weeks with no treatment needed.

The main symptom of testicular pain is sharp pain or tenderness in one or both of your testicles. This can be accompanied by swelling and bruising of the scrotum (the loose skin surrounding each testicle). Other symptoms include nausea, vomiting or fever. You may experience pain during or after sexual intercourse or while trying to pass urine (pee).

Testicular torsion is an emergency condition that causes severe pain in one of your testicles. It’s caused when blood flow through the spermatic cord — which carries oxygen-rich blood to each testicle — stops suddenly because of twisting of the cord around its attachment to your lower abdomen (abdominal wall). Testicular torsion can damage tissue in your testicle and lead to infertility if not treated quickly

When should I worry about testicle pain?

Testicle pain is a common problem. It’s usually nothing to worry about, but there are a few reasons why testicular pain can be cause for concern.

If you have any of the following symptoms, it’s best to visit your doctor or go to the emergency room:

Pain that spreads to other parts of your body (such as your groin or abdomen)

Sudden swelling in one testicle

A lump or thickening on or around one testicle

A fever above 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius)

Testicle pain is not a common symptom. But if you have any kind of testicle pain, it’s important to see a doctor.

There are several different causes of testicle pain — some serious and some not so serious. The good news is that most of them can be treated with medication or surgery.

Testicular torsion

This is a medical emergency that usually affects teenage boys and young men between the ages of 15 and 25. It happens when the spermatic cord — which connects the testicles to the rest of the body — becomes twisted and cuts off blood flow to the testicles.

If not treated quickly, this condition can result in permanent damage to your testicles — including loss of fertility.

Pain or discomfort in your scrotum may be a sign of testicular torsion, which is a medical emergency.

Testicular torsion occurs when the spermatic cord becomes twisted and cuts off blood supply to your testicle. This can cause swelling and pain in one or both testicles, but sometimes there are no symptoms at all until the testicle starts to die.

Testicular torsion is a condition that requires immediate attention from a doctor. Without treatment, it can lead to permanent damage and even death of the affected testicle.

If you have testicle pain that’s severe, comes on suddenly, and doesn’t go away in a few days, or if it’s accompanied by swelling or redness, you should see your doctor right away.

If you experience any other symptoms — such as fever, nausea, vomiting or pain in the groin — or if there’s any discharge from the penis, see your doctor as soon as possible.

If you experience any of these symptoms with testicle pain, you may have testicular torsion — a condition in which one of your testicles twists internally. This can cause blood supply to be cut off to the testicle and cause it to die. It’s an emergency situation that requires surgery within six hours for best results.

Does ejaculating hurt epididymitis?

Completing the sexual act is not recommended if you have epididymitis. There is a risk of further injury to your testicles, which can make it harder for you to urinate and cause pain in other areas of your body. Doctors usually advise patients with epididymitis not to ejaculate until they are fully recovered from their infections.

If you do ejaculate while you have epididymitis, it may make the pain worse because it increases pressure inside your scrotum. The fluid released from your prostate gland during an orgasm may also spread infection into other parts of your body.

Ejaculation doesn’t cause epididymitis.

Epididymitis is inflammation of the epididymis, which is the tube that carries sperm from the testicles to the vas deferens. It can be caused by an infection, but it can also develop as a result of injury or surgery. It can also be caused by sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) such as chlamydia and gonorrhea.

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The most common symptom of epididymitis is pain in your scrotum, which occurs when you ejaculate or move your testicles. The pain can worsen when you urinate and may radiate down your groin toward your penis or perineum (area between your anus and scrotum). Other symptoms include fever, nausea and vomiting, and swelling of your testicles.

Ejaculation does not cause epididymitis. It’s a common belief that ejaculation causes epididymitis, but there is no evidence to suggest this. Ejaculation does not cause inflammation of the epididymis.

Ejaculation is a normal and healthy part of male sexual function and often causes painless inflammation of the epididymis in some men. This can be diagnosed by a doctor as acute orchitis (inflammation of the testicles). The condition usually resolves on its own without treatment within one to three months.

If you’re experiencing pain or swelling after ejaculation, see your doctor for an evaluation.”

Ejaculation is not painful. If you are experiencing pain when ejaculating, then it’s a good idea to get checked out by a doctor to ensure that the issue isn’t something more serious.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to get or keep an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. It can be caused by problems with blood flow to the penis, nerve damage, or physical issues affecting the size or shape of your penis.

Doctors don’t know what causes ED, but they do know some risk factors, including:

Being older than 40. As you get older, testosterone levels decrease and your body may produce less semen and sperm fluid. The prostate gland also becomes larger — both of these changes can affect fertility and sex drive.

Does epididymitis show in urine test?

Does epididymitis show in urine test
Does epididymitis show in urine test

Completing the sexual act is not recommended if you have epididymitis. There is a risk of further injury to your testicles, which can make it harder for you to urinate and cause pain in other areas of your body. Doctors usually advise patients with epididymitis not to ejaculate until they are fully recovered from their infections.

If you do ejaculate while you have epididymitis, it may make the pain worse because it increases pressure inside your scrotum. The fluid released from your prostate gland during an orgasm may also spread infection into other parts of your body.

Ejaculation doesn’t cause epididymitis.

Epididymitis is inflammation of the epididymis, which is the tube that carries sperm from the testicles to the vas deferens. It can be caused by an infection, but it can also develop as a result of injury or surgery. It can also be caused by sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) such as chlamydia and gonorrhea.

The most common symptom of epididymitis is pain in your scrotum, which occurs when you ejaculate or move your testicles. The pain can worsen when you urinate and may radiate down your groin toward your penis or perineum (area between your anus and scrotum). Other symptoms include fever, nausea and vomiting, and swelling of your testicles.

Ejaculation does not cause epididymitis. It’s a common belief that ejaculation causes epididymitis, but there is no evidence to suggest this. Ejaculation does not cause inflammation of the epididymis.

Ejaculation is a normal and healthy part of male sexual function and often causes painless inflammation of the epididymis in some men. This can be diagnosed by a doctor as acute orchitis (inflammation of the testicles). The condition usually resolves on its own without treatment within one to three months.

If you’re experiencing pain or swelling after ejaculation, see your doctor for an evaluation.”

Ejaculation is not painful. If you are experiencing pain when ejaculating, then it’s a good idea to get checked out by a doctor to ensure that the issue isn’t something more serious.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to get or keep an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. It can be caused by problems with blood flow to the penis, nerve damage, or physical issues affecting the size or shape of your penis.

Doctors don’t know what causes ED, but they do know some risk factors, including:

Being older than 40. As you get older, testosterone levels decrease and your body may produce less semen and sperm fluid. The prostate gland also becomes larger — both of these changes can affect fertility and sex drive.

How do guys get epididymitis?

How do guys get epididymitis?

Ejaculation, or even the act of getting an erection, can be painful for some men. This is because there are several small structures in the testicles that may become inflamed (known as epididymalitis). These structures are called the epididymis and they run from your testicles to your vas deferens (the tube that carries sperm from your testicles to your urethra).

Epididymitis is common in sexually active males between 15 and 35 years old. It often happens after a sexually transmitted infection (STI), but can also occur without one. If you have an STI like gonorrhea or chlamydia, it’s possible that you could develop epididymitis due to an infection in another part of your body (such as your prostate gland or bladder) spreading through your bloodstream and affecting the epididymis.

Symptoms of Epididymitis

Epididymitis has a wide range of symptoms that vary from person to person. Some guys may only experience mild pain while others may have severe pain accompanied by fever and chills. Common symptoms include:

Pain in one side of the scrotum or testicle area

Epididymitis is a painful condition that occurs when the epididymis, a tube attached to the testicle that stores and transports sperm, becomes swollen and inflamed.

Epididymitis can be caused by infection or non-infectious causes. The most common cause of epididymitis in men is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) called chlamydia. Other causes include:

Sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea or chlamydia

Infections in the prostate gland or urinary tract, such as prostatitis or urethritis

Injury to the tailbone or pelvis from trauma or injury during sports activities

Testicular torsion (twisting of the spermatic cord)

Chronic inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis), which can result from an enlarged prostate gland (benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH) or other conditions affecting the prostate

Epididymitis is a condition that causes swelling of the epididymis, the tube attached to your testicles that stores and carries sperm. It’s usually caused by a bacterial infection and can cause pain, fever and other symptoms.

Epididymitis is most common in young men ages 15 to 25 and older men who’ve been diagnosed with prostate or urethral infections.

It can also develop if you have untreated chlamydia or gonorrhea. If you have an STD, it should be treated before you see a doctor for epididymitis.

Epididymitis can also occur after sexual contact with another man, particularly if he has an STD such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. This form of epididymitis is most common in adolescent boys but can affect adults of any age.

The exact cause of epididymititis isn’t known, but it may be related to poor hygiene or an imbalance of normal bacteria in the body.

Epididymitis is a painful inflammation of the epididymis, the coiled tube that connects to the testes. The epididymis stores and carries sperm from the testes to the vas deferens, which takes it to the urethra.

The condition is most common in men between ages 15 and 35, but it can occur at any age. It’s usually caused by an infection, but in rare cases it may be due to an injury or cancer.

Causes

The cause of epididymititis isn’t always known. In most cases, it’s caused by a bacterial infection or sexually transmitted disease (STD). Bacteria can enter your body through sexual intercourse with an infected partner or through having sex with someone who has a urinary tract infection (UTI). Chlamydia and gonorrhea are two common STDs that can lead to epididymitis.

In some cases, no cause can be found for epididymitis. This condition may develop as a complication of another medical problem such as:

Urinary tract infections (UTIs)

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) — like chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis and HIV/AIDS

Can sitting too long cause testicular pain?

Can sitting too long cause testicular pain
Can sitting too long cause testicular pain

Sitting for extended periods of time can cause a lot of health problems, including back pain and muscle strain. But it can also lead to testicular pain.

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Testicular pain is a common problem in men, and it may be caused by sitting too long, according to Healthline. The condition is often called scrotal or groin pain because it affects the scrotum — the sack of skin that holds your testicles — but it can also occur in other parts of the body.

The condition affects approximately 1% of men at some point in their lives, according to Healthline. It typically occurs at work or while driving and lasts for an hour or less. The condition usually develops slowly over time as you sit at the same location for long periods of time each day, although sometimes it happens suddenly when you’re moving around more than usual.

If you have testicular pain while sitting down, there are several things you can do to help relieve the symptoms:

Sitting too long can cause testicular pain. It’s not clear why, but it may be due to the way that your body shifts weight from one leg to another. It could also be because of changes in blood flow or nerve impulses or a combination of both.

The pain usually goes away when you stand up and walk around for a few minutes. If it doesn’t, see your doctor. He’ll probably recommend that you stretch, exercise or take breaks from sitting every 20 minutes or so.

If the problem continues or gets worse, your doctor might recommend physical therapy. The goal is to increase flexibility and strength in the hip muscles and pelvis (or sacroiliac joint).

Sitting too long can cause pain in the testicles. This is because the veins that carry blood back to the heart are compressed by the pressure of your thighs when you sit. The compression of these veins causes a backup of blood in them, which causes swelling in the testicles.

The pain can be quite intense and may even make it difficult to stand up or walk.

The good news is that you can relieve this type of pain by simply standing up and walking around for a couple minutes. After doing so, you can resume sitting down without experiencing any more discomfort.

Sitting too long can cause testicular pain.

Testicular pain is a common medical condition that affects men of all ages. It is a type of groin pain that may be felt in one or both testicles and can be sharp, dull, or achy.

The pain can range from mild to severe and may come on suddenly or gradually.

The exact cause of testicular pain is not always clear, but it may be caused by torsion (twisting) of the spermatic cord (the blood vessels, nerves, lymphatic vessels and testicular artery that carry blood supply to the testicle), epididymitis (inflammation of the epididymis), orchitis (inflammation of the testicle), trauma or injury to the scrotum or groin region.

Does epididymitis show in urine test

What does ball pain feel like?

Ball pain can be a symptom of many different medical conditions. The most common symptoms are:

Pain in the testicles (the male reproductive glands)

Swelling of one or both testicles

A feeling that something is pulling on the scrotum (the sac containing the testicles)

A sudden onset of pain, especially if it comes on after exercise or bending over

Ball pain is a common complaint, and it can be caused by any number of things.

Pain in the testicles or scrotum is likely to be a symptom of a problem elsewhere in the body. In some cases, there’s no reason for concern, but in others it could be a sign of something serious.

If you’re worried about your testicle pain, see your GP as soon as possible so they can assess what’s causing it. They’ll ask you about your symptoms and carry out some tests; these may include:

an examination of your balls and groin area

an ultrasound scan (which uses sound waves to create an image on a screen)

a blood test to check for infection

Ball pain is often associated with the testicles and the scrotum, which is the skin sac that holds the testicles. The main causes of ball pain include:

Infections of the testicle

Inguinal hernia, which occurs when part of your intestine pushes through a weak spot in your abdominal muscles into the groin area.

Scrotal trauma, such as from direct blows or crushing injuries.

Friction or pressure on the scrotum due to prolonged sitting (often experienced by cyclists). This can cause a painful swelling called “bicycle pump syndrome.”

The pain of testicular torsion is sudden and severe. It may feel like a dull ache or a sharp stabbing pain. If you have sudden onset of pain in one testicle, you should see your doctor immediately.

The pain can spread to the groin area, upper thigh and abdomen. A person with torsion may also have nausea and vomiting.

Testicular torsion is an emergency condition that needs to be diagnosed and treated quickly to prevent damage to your testicle.

How do you treat a strained testicle?

How do you treat a strained testicle
How do you treat a strained testicle

A strained testicle is a common sports injury that occurs when the testicle pulls away from the body during physical activity. The most common cause of this is an impact to the groin, such as might occur during a tackle in football, or a heavy fall onto your hip.

In most cases, a strained testicle will go back into place without treatment. If you have pain or swelling after an injury to your groin area, see your doctor or visit an emergency room right away.

To treat a strained testicle at home:

Rest. Stop all physical activity until your symptoms improve.

Apply ice packs to the affected area for 20 minutes every hour for the first 24 hours after the injury occurred. You can also use a bag of frozen vegetables instead of ice packs if you don’t have access to commercial products. Apply pressure on top of the bag to keep it against your skin while it’s on there.

Take over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol). Be sure not to take any medication with aspirin in it for at least two days after the injury occurred due to its blood-thinning effects — this could increase bleeding risk if you’re already having problems with internal

The main treatment for a strained testicle is rest, and the injury will usually heal on its own. You can also apply ice or heat to the area to help relieve pain and swelling.

Treatment for a strained testicle will depend on the severity of the injury.

In most cases, you’ll need to rest the injured testicle with no exercise for two weeks. After this time period, you can gradually resume normal activities, but avoid any strenuous activity that could cause further injury until all pain has gone away. If pain continues even after two weeks, it’s best to see your GP or another healthcare professional who can offer further advice and treatment options.

The most common causes of a strained testicle are sports injuries and falls.

If you’re a man, you can experience a painful swelling in one of your testicles. This condition is called testicular torsion and it’s an emergency situation that requires immediate medical attention.

Testicular torsion is a twisting of the spermatic cord that carries blood and oxygen to the testicle. When this occurs, the blood supply to the testicle may be cut off, causing it to swell up and become painful and tender. If left untreated, testicular torsion can lead to permanent damage or loss of function in that testicle.

Treatment for Testicular Torsion

The first step in treating testicular torsion is to get medical help right away — especially if you notice pain or swelling in one of your testicles or if you have any other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting or headache. Call 911 if you think you might be having a serious problem with one of your testicles.

If you’re not able to reach your doctor right away, take ibuprofen or acetaminophen (Tylenol) as recommended by your health care provider until they can see you at the office or ER.”

A testicle is one of the two reproductive organs that hang in a man’s scrotum. It makes and stores sperm, the male reproductive cells that fertilize a woman’s egg.

A strained testicle can be caused by:

Sudden twisting or pulling of the testicle

Violent kicking or punching to the groin area

Injury to the scrotum, such as from a kick in soccer or other sports

A sudden impact, such as from running into an object or falling on an outstretched hand

A blow to the groin area during contact sports, such as hockey or football