Revaxis Vaccine

Revaxis Vaccine; The document describes the survey of revaxis vaccine

Revaxis is a combined vaccine that protects against diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis.

Vaccination: Revaxis is given to an individual as an injection just under the skin (subcutaneous) or into a muscle (intramuscular).

Side effects: Side effects of the Revaxis vaccine include headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, fever, pain at the injection site and pruritus.

The Revaxis vaccine is a booster immunisation against tetanus, diphtheria and polio.

This vaccine is given to adults who missed or weren’t fully immunised against these diseases as children.

Who should have the Revaxis vaccine?

The Revaxis vaccine is recommended for anyone who hasn’t had all of the following:

Immunisation of children and adolescents

Use of the vaccine in children from 6 months of age is supported by evidence from adequate and well-controlled clinical studies. Data for the use of Revaxis in children aged 6-12 years is derived from a study conducted in 1,578 children aged 6-12 years who received Revaxis with a booster dose one year later (study 1). In this study, the immunogenicity achieved with Revaxis was similar to that observed with a diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio vaccine (DTPa-IPV) as primary vaccination.

The safety profile of Revaxis in children aged 6 months to 12 years was consistent with that observed in adults.

(i) The vaccine may be given to children and adolescents from the age of 10 years onwards, adults and the elderly.

(ii) Two doses of 0.5 ml each are given 1 month apart as a primary vaccination course.

(iii) A booster dose is recommended every 10 years thereafter.

(iv) Revaxis can be used in pregnancy (see section 4.6).

(v) If a dose is missed, the schedule should not be altered, the next dose should be given at the recommended time and subsequent doses according to the same interval between doses.

Description

Revaxis contains diphtheria, tetanus and polio. These diseases can be prevented by vaccination.

Diphtheria is an infection of the throat and nose. It is caused by a bacterium called Corynebacterium diphtheriae . Until the beginning of the twentieth century diphtheria was a major cause of death in children. It mainly affects children under 10 years of age. Diphtheria is probably caught through close contact with someone who has the disease. If you are infected, you may not be ill yourself, but could infect others. The bacteria produce a toxin which damages the body, especially the heart and nerves. This can cause fatal heart failure or paralysis (loss of movement).

Tetanus is an infection caused by a bacterium called Clostridium tetani . It can get into your body through any cut or wound, however small. It causes painful muscle spasms, which can make you lock your jaw and arch your back uncontrollably. Tetanus can be fatal if it is not treated quickly and properly.

Polio is caused by a virus which attacks the nerves, causing paralysis (loss of movement) in muscles used for moving about and breathing. In severe cases it causes permanent paralysis or death

REVAXIS is an inactivated vaccine indicated for active immunization against diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis. REVAXIS can be administered to adults and children from 6 weeks of age.

See also  Neopar Vaccine

REVAXIS is a vaccine indicated for:

Active immunization against diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis in adults and children from 6 weeks of age.

For the primary vaccination of infants from the age of 6 weeks, a 2-dose schedule with a 1-month interval should be followed.

For the primary vaccination of children from the age of 15 months or for boosters, a 1-dose schedule should be applied.

REVAXIS (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed) is a sterile suspension of inactivated Bordetella pertussis organisms for intramuscular injection.

Each 0.5 mL dose contains the following active ingredients:

4 eu of diphtheria toxoid; 5 Lf of tetanus toxoid; 8 mcg of filamentous haemagglutinin; 3 mcg of pertactin; 5 mcg of fimbriae types 2 and 3

Adjuvant Aluminium Phosphate, Potassium dihydrogen phosphate, Sodium Chloride, Disodium Phosphate Dihydrate, Potassium Chloride, Water for Injections.

What is Revaxis Vaccine?

What is Revaxis Vaccine
What is Revaxis Vaccine

Revaxis vaccine is a medicine that contains inactivated (killed) Polio virus. It protects against polio by helping the body develop immunity.

Revaxis vaccine is used to protect against polio.

Revaxis vaccine can be given to babies and children over 6 weeks of age and adults who have not been immunised before, or who are at risk of polio infection. It can also be given to people who have a weakened immune system due to disease (for example, AIDS) or treatment (for example, chemotherapy).

Revaxis vaccine is a combined vaccine containing the following antigens:

tetanus toxoid (TT), inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine (IPV), diphtheria toxoid (DT) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg).

Revaxis is used to prevent infections caused by the following bacteria:

Tetanus, caused by Clostridium tetani, a gram positive bacterium found in soil, dust and animal feces.

Diphtheria, caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae, a gram positive bacterium spread through direct contact with infected respiratory secretions.

Polio (poliomyelitis), caused by poliovirus type 1, type 2 or type 3. Poliovirus is spread through contact with faecal matter from an infected person or through direct contact with an infected person.

Hepatitis B, caused by hepatitis B virus. Hepatitis B virus is transmitted through blood and body fluids from an infected person to another person.

Revaxis is a vaccine that protects against diphtheria, tetanus and polio.

Diphtheria and tetanus are bacterial infections. They can cause very serious disease, including difficulty breathing, paralysis and death.

Polio is a viral infection. It causes paralysis (usually of the legs) and death in about 1% of cases.

Revaxis vaccine contains small amounts of proteins from the bacteria that cause these infections. These proteins are called antigens, and they stimulate your immune system to protect against infection if you come into contact with the bacteria themselves. The vaccine doesn’t contain any live bacteria so it can’t give you the diseases it protects against.

The Revaxis vaccine is a combination vaccine that is given to adults and adolescents as well as children to help protect them against polio, diphtheria, and tetanus. Diphtheria and tetanus are bacterial infections that can cause serious complications if left untreated. Polio is a viral infection that can cause paralysis in severe cases.

The Revaxis vaccine works by introducing a small amount of the weakened or dead bacteria or virus into your body. This allows your immune system to create antibodies against the disease, which protects you from becoming infected if you’re exposed to it later.

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Revaxis is a medicine that contains two different vaccines in one injection. It protects against diphtheria and tetanus.

Diphtheria and tetanus are very serious bacterial infections that can cause severe swelling and inflammation. They can be fatal if not treated promptly with antibiotics. However, it’s now possible to prevent both these infections by vaccination.

Revaxis is an inactivated vaccine that protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis. It is given by injection into the upper arm or thigh.

This vaccine can only be obtained with a prescription.

Before you are given Revaxis, your doctor will want to know if you have ever had a serious allergic reaction to a previous dose of this vaccine or any of its ingredients.

You should also tell your doctor if you:

have ever suffered from Guillain-Barré syndrome (inflammation of the nerves) after a previous dose of this vaccine or another pertussis-containing vaccine (DTaP/IPV/Hib)

have ever suffered from Encephalopathy (inflammation of the brain), which has not been explained by another cause

have immune system problems due to disease (such as HIV infection) or treatment (such as chemotherapy)

have a history of convulsions/fits/seizures

Revaxis is a vaccine used to help prevent diphtheria, tetanus, and polio. It’s also known by its drug name, DTPa-IPV.

Diphtheria is a serious bacterial infection of the nose, throat, and airways. Diphtheria can cause breathing problems and heart failure.

Tetanus is a serious bacterial infection that can cause painful muscle contractions, usually all over the body. Tetanus can make breathing difficult.

Polio is a virus that causes paralysis. Polio is spread through contact with an infected person’s feces (poop).

How Long Does Revaxis Vaccine Last?

How long does Revaxis vaccine last
How long does Revaxis vaccine last

How long does Revaxis vaccine last

Diphtheria, tetanus and polio (inactivated) vaccine.

Revaxis is a Diphtheria, Tetanus & Polio (inactivated) vaccine for use in active immunisation against diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis as a primary course or booster vaccination.

Revaxis is a combined vaccine that protects against diphtheria, tetanus and polio. The vaccine is given as a single injection on the upper arm or thigh to those aged 14 years and over.

How long does Revaxis vaccine last?

Revaxis is given as a single injection into the muscle of the upper arm or thigh. For maximum protection against polio, it’s important to have a booster dose of Revaxis 5 years after each primary course. This means you’ll need a total of three injections of Revaxis.

How long does the Revaxis vaccine last?

The Revaxis vaccine lasts for at least 10 years after it is given. This means that even if you have had this vaccination when you were younger, you will still need a booster jab before travelling to some parts of the world.

There is no official recommendation on how long the Revaxis vaccine lasts. It is believed that it will last at least 15 years, but possibly longer. The Revaxis vaccine is given to people who have had a tetanus-prone wound but are not up to date with their tetanus vaccination and also to those who have been in contact with someone with tetanus.

See also  Fvrcp Vaccine

The Revaxis vaccine contains two vaccines in one injection:

the Td vaccine. This is an older version of the dTpolio vaccine and contains both diphtheria and tetanus toxoids

the IPV vaccine. This is the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and contains three different varieties of poliovirus

If you received a Revaxis vaccine as a child and it has been more than 10 years since you were last vaccinated, or if you don’t know whether you were fully immunised against diphtheria and tetanus in childhood, it is recommended that you have a booster dose of the vaccine. You should have this if:

You are travelling to an area where there is an increased risk of infection with diphtheria or tetanus; for example, areas where there is poor sanitation

You are likely to be exposed to wounds or injury while doing your job, such as those working in laboratories handling diphtheria cultures

You are going to have surgery

If you are in one of these groups, then a single booster dose of Revaxis should give good protection. If your occupation involves regular exposure to risk, you may need further booster doses every 10 years.

Revaxis is a combined vaccine containing:

diphtheria toxoid which is a substance that has been made by growing the diphtheria germ and then killing it. The toxoid stimulates your body’s immune system to produce antibodies to diphtheria, without actually causing the disease itself

tetanus toxoid which is a substance that has been made by growing the tetanus germ and then killing it. The toxoid stimulates your body’s immune system to produce antibodies to tetanus, without actually causing the disease itself

poliomyelitis types 1, 2 and 3 inactivated (killed) virus which stimulates your body’s immune system to produce antibodies to polio types 1, 2 and 3, without actually causing polio itself

Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide conjugate (polyribosylribitol phosphate) – PRP-T, this also stimulates your body’s immune system to produce antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), without actually causing the infection itself. Hib can cause several types of serious infection including meningitis and infections of the ears, lungs and throat.

Vaccines are often administered into the skin or muscle, but some go into the nose or eyes, and a few others are given under the tongue.

If you get a vaccine in your arm, it will usually be injected into the muscle of your upper arm. Your doctor may give it to you in the buttocks if they believe there’s a good reason to do so. It’s also possible to receive this type of vaccine at specific locations such as pharmacies, your workplace or school.

Injected vaccines that contain antigens for several kinds of organisms (such as diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis) can block one another. Therefore, each of these vaccines must be given separately to be effective.

Live virus vaccines (such as measles, mumps and rubella) should not be given at the same time because they could interfere with each other’s effectiveness. However, it’s OK if a person receives two live virus vaccines that protect against different diseases at the same time. For example, MMR doesn’t interfere with varicella (the vaccine for chickenpox).